riddle 11?

Any further guesses?

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6 thoughts on “riddle 11?

  1. Hi Thoams,

    (and Hello to the Dr. Nostubauk, too. I’m a great fan of yours and of your friend Neptunia)

    The answer is:
    “Planetary Hours” and “Hour Rulers”.

    >
    (Planetary hours are named after “planets” = “wanderers, nomads” in ancient Greek)

    >
    (Each hour of the day and night is calculated and matched to a certain planet for its influence. The Planetary Hours are based on an ancient astrological system, the Chaldean order of the planets — Saturn, Jupiter, Mars, Sun, Venus, Mercury, Moon, then repeating endlessly.)

    >
    (planetary hours are not equal.
    The day is divided into two parts; the day (time between sunrise and sunset) and the night (time between sunset and tomorrow’s sunrise). Each part of the day is then divided into 12 equal parts, for a total of 24 (unequal) hours.
    In the winter, the day is shorther, so the planetary hours are shorther *fasting*, then those of of the night, which are longer *feasting* (as on Ramadan). In the summer it’s the opposite. They feast during the day and fast during the night)

    >
    (Every day, on sunrise, the first hour is ruled by the day ruler, which is unique for every day of the week)

    >
    (Yup, as mentioned above, the planetary hours are not equal like the clock hours, so the poor, terrorised Swiss mechanic can’t build a mechanical clock that will keep up with them. But a computer sure can !)

    >

    Sure, gilrs !
    You are “Planetary hours”.
    How many times do I have to repeat that ?

    Yours truely,
    The Time Keeper
    on a Martian day
    and a Saturnine hour.

  2. Hey, I put some lines from the riddle after the “>” signs !
    Where have they disppeared ?

    Huh ! Should have known better than go out and play on a Saturn hour. Shame on me.

  3. See what they say about the hour of Saturn:

    “In the hour of Saturn take no Voyage to Sea, neither take any long Journey by Land; for crosses will surely at-tend and small success may be expected; take no Physick; entertain no Servant, for they will prove idle, careless Persons: Not good to put on a new Garment or cut your Hair; but this hour is good to buy or take Leases of Houses, or Lands; good to buy any kind of Grain or dig in the Earth or Plow; not good to borrow Money in this hour or to fall sick in for it threatens a long Disease; and sometimes terminates in death.”

    Henry Coley, Clavis Astrologiae Elimata, [London, 1676] Issaquah, WA: JustUs&Assoc., 1996, p. 271.

    * Sorry, I stole this from :
    http://www.renaissanceastrology.com/planetaryhoursrenaissance.html

    And may I add my own lesson:
    “In the hour of Saturn attempt no riddle solving, post no comments on blogs, put no quotations between “

  4. Hello Time Keeper,

    Named as you are I would have been surprised if you hadn’t guessed the riddle! Yes. Planatary Hours is right.

    The lines are there, but in invisible ink! 🙂
    But I don’t think anyone has written a programme for that yet.

    best wishes,
    Thomas

    PS Dr. N. sends his most gracious greeting.

  5. Dear TimeKeeper,
    Your Saturn posting was truly delayed! It has just now been de-spamed!
    There might be something to it! 🙂
    Thomas

    PS Thank you for the planetary hour link.

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